We use cookies to personalize content, ads, social media and to analyze our traffic. Social media, advertising and analytics partners may combine information provided to them or collected from your use of their services and as set out in our Privacy Policy updated for GDPR compliance https://swomi.com/privacy-policy. You consent to our cookies if you continue to use our website.

The History Behind The Merriest Time Of The Year

The holiday experience is richer when you know the history behind it.

This article is letter (H) of our “Happy Holiday" series where we write an article for each letter of the phrase. “Happy Holiday" is a series that shows your content has value every day of the year... even during the holiday season! Find links to more articles in the series below.

 

In your day to day life, do you get so settled into routine that you forget many of the things you do are specific to your culture?

A clear example is how us North Americans greet others with “Happy Holidays” or “Season’s Greetings” without a second thought.

But just exactly how did these phrases come about? What was their original meaning before they became repetitive, good-willed phrases?

 

Happy Holidays… Or Merry Christmas?

 

Many of us believe “Merry Christmas” and “Happy Holidays” to be one and the same. But “Happy Holidays” refers to the spectrum of holidays like Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s, Hannukah, and Kwanzaa.

 

The Beginnings Of Season’s Greetings

 

As far back as the 1950’s presidents like Dwight D. Eisenhower used “Season’s Greetings” on presidential holiday cards. Later presidents followed the same sentiment to not alienate those who did not celebrate Christmas.

 

Celebrations Around The World!

 

The way everyone celebrates the holidays is different around the world. Take Christmas. Swedish serve herring fish on their Christmas Eve. Children go from door to door singing Christmas carols in exchange for coins in Italy. In Japan, the main festivities happen on Christmas Eve instead of Christmas Day.

 

Word Up:

The phrase “Happy Holidays” has been around for more than a hundred years. Let’s keep the tradition going… Happy Holidays, dear reader!

 

Source: khbuzz, history, hburgjeremy

 

This article is letter (H) of our “Happy Holiday" series where we write an article for each letter of the phrase. “Happy Holiday" is a series that shows your content has value every day of the year... even during the holiday season! Find links to more articles in the series below.

(H) Looks Like The (H)olidays Are Upon Us!

(A)ll The Best Holiday Quotes To Spread The Cheer!

(P) Use (P)ersonalization For Online Marketing AND Holiday Gifts

(P) Is It Okay To Give (P)ets As Gifts? With Virtual Pets It Is!

(Y) Happy (Y)uletide To All And To All A Good Yuletide

 

(H) The (H)istory Behind The Merriest Time Of The Year

(O)nline Holiday Shopping

(L) Mind Blowing, Epic Christmas (L)ights For The Best Holiday Ever

(I) Ditch The Boring Gifts And Give These 9 (I)nnovative Ones Instead

(D) The Best (D)rinks, Dishes, And Desserts For Your Holiday Party

(A) Festive (A)rts & Activities To Create Fun Holiday Memories

(Y) Your (Y)ear In Review - Set New Goals For The New Year

(S) Seasonal (S)ongs To Sing Along With

The History Behind The Merriest Time Of The Year

The holiday experience is richer when you know the history behind it.

This article is letter (H) of our “Happy Holiday" series where we write an article for each letter of the phrase. “Happy Holiday" is a series that shows your content has value every day of the year... even during the holiday season! Find links to more articles in the series below.

 

In your day to day life, do you get so settled into routine that you forget many of the things you do are specific to your culture?

A clear example is how us North Americans greet others with “Happy Holidays” or “Season’s Greetings” without a second thought.

But just exactly how did these phrases come about? What was their original meaning before they became repetitive, good-willed phrases?

 

Happy Holidays… Or Merry Christmas?

 

Many of us believe “Merry Christmas” and “Happy Holidays” to be one and the same. But “Happy Holidays” refers to the spectrum of holidays like Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s, Hannukah, and Kwanzaa.

 

The Beginnings Of Season’s Greetings

 

As far back as the 1950’s presidents like Dwight D. Eisenhower used “Season’s Greetings” on presidential holiday cards. Later presidents followed the same sentiment to not alienate those who did not celebrate Christmas.

 

Celebrations Around The World!

 

The way everyone celebrates the holidays is different around the world. Take Christmas. Swedish serve herring fish on their Christmas Eve. Children go from door to door singing Christmas carols in exchange for coins in Italy. In Japan, the main festivities happen on Christmas Eve instead of Christmas Day.

 

Word Up:

The phrase “Happy Holidays” has been around for more than a hundred years. Let’s keep the tradition going… Happy Holidays, dear reader!

 

Source: khbuzz, history, hburgjeremy

 

This article is letter (H) of our “Happy Holiday" series where we write an article for each letter of the phrase. “Happy Holiday" is a series that shows your content has value every day of the year... even during the holiday season! Find links to more articles in the series below.

(H) Looks Like The (H)olidays Are Upon Us!

(A)ll The Best Holiday Quotes To Spread The Cheer!

(P) Use (P)ersonalization For Online Marketing AND Holiday Gifts

(P) Is It Okay To Give (P)ets As Gifts? With Virtual Pets It Is!

(Y) Happy (Y)uletide To All And To All A Good Yuletide

 

(H) The (H)istory Behind The Merriest Time Of The Year

(O)nline Holiday Shopping

(L) Mind Blowing, Epic Christmas (L)ights For The Best Holiday Ever

(I) Ditch The Boring Gifts And Give These 9 (I)nnovative Ones Instead

(D) The Best (D)rinks, Dishes, And Desserts For Your Holiday Party

(A) Festive (A)rts & Activities To Create Fun Holiday Memories

(Y) Your (Y)ear In Review - Set New Goals For The New Year

(S) Seasonal (S)ongs To Sing Along With


Log in to comment