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Away From Digital Narcissism And Towards Self-Actualization

How we need to move towards connection and away from the self.

When faced with more screens, apps, and games do we rise to our highest selves or do we numb ourselves with endless, mindless scrolling?

Unfortunately, observational research, and even the founders of the most popular social platforms, confirm that online usage promotes digital narcissism – a grandoise, entitled sense of self constantly in need of external validation.

Fortunately we’re going to share how to recognize digital narcissism in yourself and others in order to become an overall better human being despite living in a world that encourages otherwise.

 

 

Do You Empower Yourself With Digital Narcissism?

Living and growing up in a technological age has changed how we feel about ourselves, treat others, and connect with society as a whole. Brian Solis explains:

“we contribute to our egosystem where we by default become the center of our own digital universe. Experiences and engagement therefore represent the orbits that bring us together….To better understand the crux of selfies and the digital “me”, Twenge explains that at the core of narcissism is this invention or aspiration that people are better or more important than in reality. In the digital realm however, perception is reality.”

What does digital narcissism look like? If you find yourself upgrading your phone more than your outdated set of beliefs, have a smartphone image gallery of mostly selfies, get thousands of likes but still feel unfulfilled, then you may be steering down the path of digital narcissism.

 

How Your Valuable Content Is Used Online

Technology is like a hammer. What are all the good things you can do with a Hammer? Build a house. Fix your grandma’s table. Make art. Basically, all the good things you can do with a Hammer are building and creating. Now, what are the bad things you can do with a Hammer? Hit someone. Throw it. Leave it laying around where someone can trip on it. In contrast, anything bad you can do with a hammer is destructive.

With this in mind, does the way Technology is implemented build people up to become better citizens, family members, and friends? Or is technology implemented in a way to tear people down and make their self-esteems dependent on online validation?

Sean Parker, early founder of Facebook confirms in an interview with Axios that

“Facebook is designed to exploit ‘a vulnerability in human psychology’ to get its users addicted. The inventors, creators — it’s me, it’s Mark [Zuckerberg], it’s Kevin Systrom on Instagram, it’s all of these people — understood this consciously,’ he said. ‘And we did it anyway.’”

 

Towards Self Actualization

On the plus side (we are always looking for the positive), there are just a few simple mindset tweaks to get to the other side of digital narcissism. What does the other side look like? Interestingly enough, Australian psychologist and author Meredith Fuller explains people, especially the youth, '...aren't hearing about the benefits of these mysterious things we talk about, like kindness, manners and commitment and gratitude. It has no currency for them. They just don't get it because they don't see it.''

The most simple, yet profound, change you can make is to practice gratitude. What you focus on grows. Make the conscious choice to appreciate on what you have rather than complain about what you lack and watch how your quality of life can flourish.

Not all narcissism is bad either. Humble narcissism, an optimal state of mind for leaders, says “I am capable of achieving extraordinary things, but I always have room to grow, learn, and be grateful.”

 

Word Up: Towards Self-Actualization And The Content Lifestyle

Our lives and technology are deeply intermixed. We can’t have one without the other if we are to live among society.

Swomi was created to encourage you to become your best self through receiving the benefits of your online content and living the Content Lifestyle as a result.

What is the Content Lifestyle?

It’s when you live a life of freedom thanks to receiving the true value of your online Content. Sign up for a Swomi Flyer to take the first step to living the Content Lifestyle.

 

Sources: nypost, briansolis, ted

Away From Digital Narcissism And Towards Self-Actualization

How we need to move towards connection and away from the self.

When faced with more screens, apps, and games do we rise to our highest selves or do we numb ourselves with endless, mindless scrolling?

Unfortunately, observational research, and even the founders of the most popular social platforms, confirm that online usage promotes digital narcissism – a grandoise, entitled sense of self constantly in need of external validation.

Fortunately we’re going to share how to recognize digital narcissism in yourself and others in order to become an overall better human being despite living in a world that encourages otherwise.

 

 

Do You Empower Yourself With Digital Narcissism?

Living and growing up in a technological age has changed how we feel about ourselves, treat others, and connect with society as a whole. Brian Solis explains:

“we contribute to our egosystem where we by default become the center of our own digital universe. Experiences and engagement therefore represent the orbits that bring us together….To better understand the crux of selfies and the digital “me”, Twenge explains that at the core of narcissism is this invention or aspiration that people are better or more important than in reality. In the digital realm however, perception is reality.”

What does digital narcissism look like? If you find yourself upgrading your phone more than your outdated set of beliefs, have a smartphone image gallery of mostly selfies, get thousands of likes but still feel unfulfilled, then you may be steering down the path of digital narcissism.

 

How Your Valuable Content Is Used Online

Technology is like a hammer. What are all the good things you can do with a Hammer? Build a house. Fix your grandma’s table. Make art. Basically, all the good things you can do with a Hammer are building and creating. Now, what are the bad things you can do with a Hammer? Hit someone. Throw it. Leave it laying around where someone can trip on it. In contrast, anything bad you can do with a hammer is destructive.

With this in mind, does the way Technology is implemented build people up to become better citizens, family members, and friends? Or is technology implemented in a way to tear people down and make their self-esteems dependent on online validation?

Sean Parker, early founder of Facebook confirms in an interview with Axios that

“Facebook is designed to exploit ‘a vulnerability in human psychology’ to get its users addicted. The inventors, creators — it’s me, it’s Mark [Zuckerberg], it’s Kevin Systrom on Instagram, it’s all of these people — understood this consciously,’ he said. ‘And we did it anyway.’”

 

Towards Self Actualization

On the plus side (we are always looking for the positive), there are just a few simple mindset tweaks to get to the other side of digital narcissism. What does the other side look like? Interestingly enough, Australian psychologist and author Meredith Fuller explains people, especially the youth, '...aren't hearing about the benefits of these mysterious things we talk about, like kindness, manners and commitment and gratitude. It has no currency for them. They just don't get it because they don't see it.''

The most simple, yet profound, change you can make is to practice gratitude. What you focus on grows. Make the conscious choice to appreciate on what you have rather than complain about what you lack and watch how your quality of life can flourish.

Not all narcissism is bad either. Humble narcissism, an optimal state of mind for leaders, says “I am capable of achieving extraordinary things, but I always have room to grow, learn, and be grateful.”

 

Word Up: Towards Self-Actualization And The Content Lifestyle

Our lives and technology are deeply intermixed. We can’t have one without the other if we are to live among society.

Swomi was created to encourage you to become your best self through receiving the benefits of your online content and living the Content Lifestyle as a result.

What is the Content Lifestyle?

It’s when you live a life of freedom thanks to receiving the true value of your online Content. Sign up for a Swomi Flyer to take the first step to living the Content Lifestyle.

 

Sources: nypost, briansolis, ted


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